Immigranterna – USA via Vladivostok

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Vladivostok Expected to Become Port of Escape for Marooned Refugees

The Soviet port of Vladivostok, in the Far East, may become a jumping-off place for thousands of refugees seeking homes in North and South America, Australia and South Africa, if the American program of substantial aid to Russia materialises, it was stated here today.

Current tense relations between Japan and America have closed the last exit to freedom for about 1,000 Jewish refugees stranded in Japan and many thousands in Shanghai. At the United States Maritime Commission where preparations are now being made “for any eventuality” in the matter of arranging transport from Japan, it was said today that the plans did not contemplate providing passage for anyone but American citizens, because of the shipping shortage.

At the State Department it was stated today that it would be impossible to determine here the number of refugees in Japan and occupied China who hold, or are seeking, visas for entry into the United States, but it was admitted that there were a substantial number in both places.

In view of the present situation in the Far East, it is extremely unlikely that Japanese shipping will touch at American or Canadian ports for some time. The calls by American President liners and freighters at Shanghai will similarly be abandoned. Canadian shipping is likewise to be restricted. However, the materialization of the program of substantial American aid to Soviet Russia may create a certain amount of trans-Pacific traffic from Vladivostok, since the steamers carrying freight from the United States to the Russian Far Eastern port will be able to carry passengers on their way back to the United States.

Mrs. Roosevelt Lauds $14,000,000 Plan for Immigrant Education

Plans for the expenditure of $14,000,000 in a national immigrant education program marks an effort on the part of the United states to take full advantage of the contributions emigrees from European terror can offer this country, Eleanor Roosevelt told 130 state and local education officials, and federal bureau chiefs gathered at the White House this afternoon.

She spoke before educators, Bureau of Immigration and Naturalization officials, WPA and U.S. Office of Education chiefs and others attending the conference to develop plans for education of aliens for citizenship requirements.

The first lady deplored the tendency on the part of some Americans to differentiate between native and foreign-born Americans, pointing out that most of the latter could not be considered dangerous to democracy as their experiences in Europe were calculated to make them more keenly aware of the value of freedom.

Mrs. Roosevelt was introduced by Daan William Fletcher Russell, of Columbia University Teachers College, Director of the program, who pointed out that in recent months 1,750,000 aliens applying for citizenship had been told they would need training in English, American History and other subjects to qualify. “The task of providing education for this number of men and women, more than the total enrollment of American colleges, is a staggering one that can only be met by a coordinated national effort,” he said.

Under tentative plans being developed at the conference the MPA will provide funds for instructors, local education units acting as co-sponsors will supply facilities and the Immigration and Natunalisation Service will provide the necessary content with the 1,000,000 immigrants the program is expected to reach.

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